#DM7 Article: The Abuse Of A Dream

My latest is up at Da Tech Guy blog: The Abuse of a Dream

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This past week marked Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. day in the United States. While many took time out to remember the message of Dr. King and his Dream, others took time to assail political opponents and abuse the Dream. At Duke University, an event to commemorate the icon and day turned ugly, degenerating into a host of insults directed at Republican North Carolina legislators. The College Fix:

DURHAM – An observance at Duke University on Sunday meant to honor Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. ended up as a platform to bash North Carolina Republicans and their reform policies.

The event, held inside a chapel at Duke University, began with Duke student and president of the campus Black Student Alliance Marcus Benning citing Maya Angelou’s “I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings” to criticize the Republican-controlled state Assembly.

“I know why the caged bird sings,” he said. “Because when institutions like the one in Raleigh put up restrictive laws, we begin to sing and fight back.”

Benning’s remarks were in reference to the state’s “Moral Monday” movement, large and disruptive civil disobedience demonstrations at the statehouse, where liberal activists decried the Republican-held majority and its approval of issues such as voter-ID laws and fiscal responsibility on public education.

Read the whole thing. NAACP’s Ben Jealous also got into the act. Paging James O’Keefe

Another such instance of abuse came from the leader of Moral Monday, Reverend Barber. Barber took aim at South Carolina’s Tim Scott, comparing him to a ventriloquist’s dummy as the Daily Haymaker documented:

“[…] A ventriloquist can always find a good dummy,” Rev. William Barber II said of South Carolina Republican Sen. Tim Scott, according to South Carolina’s The State. “[T]he extreme right wing down here (in South Carolina) finds a black guy to be senator and claims he’s the first black senator since Reconstruction and then he goes to Washington, D.C., and articulates the agenda of the Tea Party. […]”   – North Carolina NAACP president William Barber  January 20, 2014

Scott did not take the comment lying down and fired back at Barber. The Daily Caller reported:

“To reflect seriously on the comments a person, a pastor, that is filled with baseless and meaningless rhetoric would be to do a disservice to the very people who have sacrificed so much and paved a way,” Scott told The Daily Caller in an emailed statement. “Instead, I will honor the memory of Dr. King by being proactive in holding the door for others and serving my fellow man.  And Rev. Barber will remind me and others of what not to do.”

Also, further down:

Scott explained that he has never met Barber and implied that the NAACP chapter head knows nothing about him.

“I did not meet him when I was failing out of high school.  I did not see him on the streets of my neighborhoods where too many of my friends got off track and never recovered.  I did not meet him when I was working 85 hour weeks to start my business, nor did I meet him when I was running for Congress against long odds.  But who I did meet were people everywhere across this state who were willing to work hard and to help me succeed — and I them,” Scott said.

Indeed. Democrats and the Left truly have their heads in the sand when it comes to their own history.  Reverend Barber has a perverse sense of what Dr. King and his Dream are about as Sister Toldjah observes:

South Carolina’s “The State” news outlet published what equates to a puff piece this past weekend on the now-nationally recognized opportunistic NC NAACP President/Reverend William Barber.  Barber is the so-called “leader” of the unhinged “Moral Monday” movement here in NC that has waged a vicious war against our GOP-controlled state legislature (otherwise known as the General Assembly) since former Charlotte Mayor Pat McCrory (R) was sworn into the Governor’s office last January.   NC Democrats, drunk on FULL power here for well over a century, are not used to being in the passenger seat and are taking the “any means necessary” approach to trying to return to their glory days where they had little to no opposition.  I’ve written about both Barber and the “Moral Monday” activist left here, in case you’re curious about the back story.

Sister Toldjah also refuted the Left in NC proposing Barber is just like Dr. King.

Indeed. I’ve written extensively on Reverend Barber, his race baiting and his rather violent rhetoric. For a refresher, revisit my articles A Primer on The Left In NC, part One, Two, Three and Four.

UPDATE: Barber has refused to apologize. 

Perversion of an icon to push a national agenda

Reverend Barber wasn’t the only one pushing the limit on Martin Luther King day as evidenced by a rather disgusting op-ed by NY Education Commissioner, John King.  In the op-ed, King promotes Common Core by playing on the memory of Dr. Martin Luther King. The op-ed was titled “Dr. King and The Common Core” and equates Common Core with the emancipation proclamation. No, I’m not kidding. Excerpt:

The Common Core offers a path to the precise reading, writing and thinking skills that will help propel their children and children across the state to success. Yet some now want us to delay, or even abandon, our efforts to raise standards. I say no. As King said in that speech a little more than fifty years ago, “We do not have as much time as the cautious and the patient try to give us.” We have many great schools in New York State, but we do not have time to wait to dramatically transform those that are not working. We do not have time to wait to give all students — regardless of their race or zip code or the language they speak at home — access to the enriching and engaging learning experiences they need and deserve. And we do not have time to wait to ensure that the students who graduate from our high schools do so ready to succeed in college and careers. King concludes his speech this way: “And so I close by quoting the words of an old Negro slave preacher who didn’t quite have his grammar right but uttered words of great symbolic profundity and they were uttered in the form of a prayer: ‘Lord, we ain’t what we oughta be. We ain’t what we want to be. We ain’t what we gonna be. But, thank God, we ain’t what we wuz.’ ” So let us all pledge today — Dr. King’s birthday — to do whatever we can to make real the promise of the Emancipation Proclamation, the promise of King’s words and the promise of equal educational opportunity for all. Our children cannot wait.

Good grief. Did you get that? Common Core is like freeing the slaves… or something. Race card played. Billions spent on education in this country filled with more and more government intrusion has brought us to where we are today, yet Ed Commissioner King likens it to Martin Luther King’s Dream speech and the Emancipation Proclamation.  Common Core is the opposite of what Dr. King was dreaming of. Dr. King’s messages of tolerance, of preserving the rights of the individual and of acceptance of the beliefs of others lay abused and tattered at the wayside by the very people who claim to be upholding them.   Quick update on the state of Common Core In North Carolina The next meeting of the NC General Assembly’s Common Core Study Committee has been set for February 20th at 10 am. The full details can be viewed at StopCommonCoreNC. What has also been revealed is that the 3rd and final meeting of this committee, which is the portion where public comment can be heard, has been pushed out to after the short session. That means the public won’t get to comment until right before school starts again; Common Core will persist in our classrooms. This is unacceptable and amounts to shutuppery.  There have been no public forums on Common Core in NC. The citizens have had no way to speak out and now they are being put off until the 11th hour? I sincerely hope the committee reconsiders this, as it would be disadvantageous to this legislature to have both sides of the political fence protesting them in tandem.

Related Read: An Open Letter To NC Governor McCrory

About A.P. Dillon

A.P. Dillon is a freelance journalist and is currently writing at The North State Journal. She resides in the Triangle area of North Carolina. Find her on Twitter: @APDillon_
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