More Proof Common Core Is Not ‘Just a Set of Standards’

CommonCoreAligned“…to create just these kinds of tests—next-generation assessments aligned to the common core. When the tests are aligned to the common standards, the curriculum will line up as well—and that will unleash powerful market forces in the service of better teaching.”
– Bill Gates, 2009 Speech To Natl. Conference of State Legislatures

 

“It’s just a set of standards.”

Yeah, right.
I’ve got some oceanfront property in Kansas to sell you if you believe that line.

Meet EQuIP:

EQuIP (Educators Evaluating the Quality of Instructional Products)is an initiative of the American Diploma Project (ADP) Network designed to identify high-quality materials aligned to the Common Core State Standards (CCSS). 

The objectives are two-fold:

  • Increase the supply of high quality lessons and units aligned to the CCSS that are available to elementary, middle, and high school teachers as soon as possible; and
  • Build the capacity of educators to evaluate and improve the quality of instructional materials for use in their classrooms and schools.

EQuIP builds on a collaborative effort of education leaders from Massachusetts, New York and Rhode Island that Achieve facilitated. The outcome of that effort was the development of the “Tri-State Rubrics” and a quality review process designed to determine the quality and alignment of instructional lessons and units to the CCSS.

The days of  teachers and schools choosing their own curriculum and materials are ending.

Select groups like this are picking winners and losers. To borrow from Occupy,  they are the 1% dictating to the 99%.  Of course, the EQuIP page doesn’t say WHO these select people are.

Yes, North Carolina is tied to this thing via the American Diploma Project. Note the progressive moniker: Moving NC Forward.

EQuIP is not funded by Bill Gates. Shocker, I know. It’s Hewlett this time. See the bottom of the EQuIP handout:

“EQuIP is supported generously by the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation and MetLife Foundation.”

Reminder, Achieve is also drowning in Gates money.
Here’s their latest grant at over $9.2 million.

Date: June 2012
Purpose: to strengthen and expand the ADP Network, provide more support to states for CCSS implementation, and build strategic national and statewide alliances by engaging directly with key stakeholders
Amount: $9,297,699
Term: 49
Topic: College-Ready
Regions Served: GLOBAL|NORTH AMERICA
Program: United States
Grantee Location: Washington D.C., District of Columbia
Grantee Website: http://www.achieve.org

About A.P. Dillon

A.P. Dillon is a freelance journalist and is currently writing at The North State Journal. She resides in the Triangle area of North Carolina. Find her on Twitter: @APDillon_
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8 Responses to More Proof Common Core Is Not ‘Just a Set of Standards’

  1. Mr_Kunkel says:

    Well first, equip does not equal common core. They are a separate entity. Second, I don’t see where teachers are being forced to use and equip curriculum. A group providing a framework for evaluating whether a lesson is common core aligned seems hardly nefarious.

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    • First, I said it was Common Core Aligned. It is.
      Second, teachers aren’t forced to use it, nor did I make statements that indicated that.
      Third, as to nefarious (your term, not mine) — using our kids to generate profit on a set of experimental and fundamentally flawed standards may not be nefarious to some, but it is definitely rather disgusting.

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      • Mr_Kunkel says:

        Your title implies that Common Core is more than standards. So, forgive me, but when you go on to talk about Equip the implication is that they are somehow connected.

        Textbook publishers have been generating profits off state standards forever. This is nothing new.

        Finally, while I suppose that calling the CCSS experimental is not wrong, I don’t think that any state had rigorous;y researched standards precss so I don’t see how this is any different.

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      • Common Core is more than just standards.
        Testing, assessments, materials, apps? All driven by the standards; inextricably linked.

        “Textbook publishers have been generating profits off state standards forever.”
        Not like this; we’re in the digital age now remember?

        “I don’t think that any state had rigorous;y researched standards precss so I don’t see how this is any different.”

        That’s where you’d be wrong; especially in NC where there is a long vetting process for standards revisions.

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      • Mr_Kunkel says:

        “Common Core is more than just standards.
        Testing, assessments, materials, apps? All driven by the standards; inextricably linked.”

        Driven but not written by the standards group. Of course standards drive the creation of other things. BUT, the same group who wrote the standards doesn’t also make those materials.

        I don’t see how being in a digital age makes the profits any different. If anything there are more varied opportunities to find quality materials with multiple states having the same standards. Teachers can share materials digital across state lines. Previously with each state having its own unique sequencing that was difficult. Now it is much easier. Yes, the potential for giants (like pearson) to have undue influence is there. I for one dislike how it is actually the assessment that drives most instruction; not the standards. This is not common core’s fault directly. The linking between standards and heavy-handed state testing policies is to blame there. NCLB started that; not common core.

        I don’t know NC admittedly, but having a long vetting process doesn’t mean research-based. Who wrote those standards?

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      • “BUT, the same group who wrote the standards doesn’t also make those materials.”

        And that makes a difference why?

        Digital ages brings with it other issues like privacy, quality and data integrity. Apps are a dime a dozen and being propelled by a set of specific set of standards.
        You should do some homework. Read about the Gates push to fund app makers with Common Core as their focus. Read about their funding of non-profits to push said apps.
        If one floods the market with these things, it makes it harder to get out of using the Core.

        I don’t know NC admittedly, but having a long vetting process doesn’t mean research-based. Who wrote those standards?

        Then you have some reading to do.
        Vetting includes looking at the basis for use of any given standard; which in the past were all tested prior to implementation and included researched based explanations. That’s kind of the purpose of vetting?
        Our standards in the past were created by experienced NC teachers and education professionals with K-12 classroom experience. The same cannot be said of the Core.

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  2. Pingback: The Common Core Weekend Reads - 11-2-14 - Stop Common Core NCStop Common Core NC

  3. Fred Beggs says:

    Only the students can shut down common core. The rest of us are just a bunch of illiterate parents swooning over our children. Empower your children to ask why.

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